Writing Copy that Results in Website Conversions

Writing Copy that Results in Website Conversions

Website conversions, not just traffic, are going to play a large part in the overall digital health of your business. Many businesses carry a hefty design budget, and then when it comes to writing, they are ready to throw something together in order to put the project in the finished column. They know they need the search engine visibility, so they are ready to use the same keyword 50 times in order to make it rank. There is a fundamental flaw when it comes to this common content strategy. Good design draws people in. Repetitive keyword usage might make your site rank high initially, but if Google detects a lack of value, it could place your site in a hole that will be tough to climb out of. Let’s just say you were hypothetically able to attract large amounts of traffic by gaming the system, and writing spammy content. Thousands of people flock to your site. With no good story, no emotional appeal, and no clear and concise call to action, you are likely to lose out. A numbers game is probably not going to work in your favor. If your content is spammy, overly salesy, and not useful, you’re not likely to reap the benefits of your large pool of traffic. Even in a large crowd, most will be able to see through this type of artificial content strategy. It takes a more holistic approach to achieve more website conversions. Achieving Website Conversions, and Not Just Traffic  It takes a little effort to not only achieve a sustained amount of website traffic, but also receive the intended results...
How to Know When Your Web Copy Stinks

How to Know When Your Web Copy Stinks

You’ve built a website, and you’ve written your web copy. You’re blogging, because that’s what everyone told you that you needed to do. Maybe it’s been months, or years, and your website isn’t really doing much to boost your sales. Sometimes it just takes patience for your message to resonate, and to build a little traction with the web copy you are creating. And sometimes you may be in need of a repair, or at least a quick tune up. How do you know the difference? Here are a few signs your web copy stinks, and you might not even know it. Your headline falls flat – Let’s say you just spent hours crafting the perfect blog post, or the perfect web page content. Those 5-10 words you toss up at the top are just an easy afterthought, right? Wrong. Your headline is the single biggest factor on whether someone is going to read your post. If it seems flat or boring, people can always move on to the next search result. On social media you’ll want to pay close attention to the headline and the text you use to introduce your piece. Your message doesn’t resonate – If you blog or write your web content like it is a commercial or ad, you’re probably not going to identify with your customer. No sane consumer sits down at the computer with the idea of being sold to for eight hours. The Internet is not the medium for interruption marketing. They have a problem, and are looking for ways to solve it. The higher up in your content you can...
13 Tips on Writing for the Web

13 Tips on Writing for the Web

Writing for the web is a necessary part of running a business. It’s important to communicate your business’s message in a way your audience will identify with. That means a firm understanding of the English language (hello grammar and spelling), but also occasionally making your high school English teacher roll her eyes (shorter sentences, contractions). Writing for the web is an experiment in finding what works for your audience. 13 Tips Writing for the Web Use shorter sentences and shorter paragraphs. Website readers tend to scan. They have a lot of information in front of them, with a generally shorter attention span. A good rule of thumb is to make sure that one sentence is never longer than three lines on your computer. Paragraphs can be two to three sentences long. You’re not writing expansive pieces of fiction. Always check your grammar and spelling. Misspelled words and grammatical mistakes can chip away at your credibility. Readers may question your expertise and be tempted to move on to the next site in the listings, if they notice a lot of writing mistakes. It may be time to hire a copy editor or proofreader to look over your work. Think visually. Sure this means photographs and graphics, but it also means breaking your text up with subheads and lists. It makes reading your important blog post more manageable. Hook your customers up front. Use your headline and lead paragraphs to draw your customers into your writing, and engage them in what you have to say. You can do this by demonstrating you understand their pain point, rather than simply trying to...
5 Small Tweaks to Improve Web Content for Better Sales

5 Small Tweaks to Improve Web Content for Better Sales

Is your web content doing all that it can to improve your business? Your website should be the base of your marketing operations. It’s the location where you can convey your message in its entirety, and where you set the rules. If your web content hasn’t been generating sales, here’s five small tweaks that can help you improve web content: 1) Use a call to action – Your readers may not immediately understand what you want them to do. A call to action clarifies your request. It doesn’t have to mean asking for the sale, but in web copy, brochures, sales letters, and other traditional marketing it should. In blogging it can mean asking for the sale, but it can also mean asking people to: download your eBook, sign up for your newsletter or comment on your post. There are a variety of actions you can ask your readers to take, and you want them to stay engaged. 2) Write conversationally – Your readers probably won’t have as much knowledge about your industry as you do. You’re also asking them to stick with your blog instead of moving on to the next search result. If you want people to identify with you and your business, one of the best tricks is to write how you’d talk. Picture yourself out for coffee with your reader. You’ll sound stuffy if you avoid contractions. So just be natural. Just be you. 3) Answer your readers’ questions – Your readers are busy people, and they are on a quest. There’s an underlying purpose that brought them to your blog. So give them the...
Why an About Page is Important

Why an About Page is Important

The about page is crucial in establishing a connection with potential customers. Think about the type of online consumer you are. When you need a plumber, what happens? When you are looking for a restaurant in the area, what do you do? Same thing with a fitness place, a hardware store, or a bakery. Chances are you probably use Google to find a local business. You quickly make your way through the highest listings, searching for which businesses are credible, and which treat their online presence like spam. Where’s the first place you go to investigate a new business? The Importance of the About Page Nearly every website has one, and it’s an important factor in establishing credibility. Your potential customer wants to know: Who you are and what you do. That you are qualified for the job. That you understand their problem and offer solutions on how to fix it. You know, all the things you look for as a consumer yourself. In an environment when your customers are making purchasing decisions within minutes, it is crucial that you show them that you can heal their pain and solve their problems. This makes the about page about positioning. So instead of telling us where you went to college and what degrees you have in the first sentence, how about identifying your customers’ typical problems? What do they come to you to fix and how do you do it? This can draw your readers in and let them know you are serious. Introducing Yourself Once they know you can deal with their issue you can introduce yourself, and give...
5 Tips for Writing Content That Converts

5 Tips for Writing Content That Converts

Design draws people in, but good writing is required to produce content that converts. Your customers don’t hover around the computer all day reading 8 hours worth of advertising materials. They want to be smarter. They want to make informed decisions. They want to be the DIYers. Remember, traffic won’t pay the bills. Here are some suggestions for writing content that converts: Say What You Mean, Mean What You Say – Have you ever received an email that didn’t get to the point until the third paragraph? It leaves you wondering why it was sent at all, through the majority of the reading. Make sure that your emails, blogs, website content and anything else people might read about your business gets straight to the point. Make sure through the headline and a summary sentence that people understand exactly how they will benefit by investing their time in your marketing materials. When you leave people guessing, they likely won’t get much further. Understanding Demand – I’m not talking about demand for your product, but that’s important too. What I’m talking about is the information your customers are demanding. What do they want to know? What kind of questions are they asking? If you can put the type of information they are looking for in front of them, you’ll have a built in audience of invested readers. Think about the type of questions they regularly ask about your industry. Think about the conversations you’ve had with your customers. Picture them when you write. They’re who reads your work. If you don’t know what kind of information they are looking for, ask. ...