What Hiring a Copy Editor Can Do For Your Business

What Hiring a Copy Editor Can Do For Your Business

Hiring A Copy Editor Instills Trust In Your Business Hiring a good copy editor can be the difference between making a sale or losing it. You may be the ultimate expert in your field. You may have the insight, experience and credibility to command attention from your readers. You might even communicate that knowledge in an interesting and respectable way. Then, by the time your marketing materials arrive at the call to action, there is a typo, misspelling or other grammatical error. It might not matter much to you, but for the reader it can have a tremendous impact. There is a financial impact to bad grammar. These kinds of mistakes quickly erode trust in a business. At the same time, businesses need to blog more. Consumers are continuously on the lookout for businesses that can differentiate themselves from the competition through better content. It is important not to let the pressure to produce lead to more errors. Businesses need to utilize their blog as a channel for telling their story. If writing is not something that comes naturally, businesses might need a second set of eyes to review their writing before publication. Even if writing does come naturally, having someone to look over blogs, emails and other marketing before it is published can keep a business looking professional. It is a good idea to utilize the services of a copy editor before publishing any marketing writing to avoid mistakes. Hiring a copy editor can help you to ensure that you are using the correct “You’re” or “It’s.” They can help to make sure that everything is spelled correctly (spellcheck doesn’t catch it all)....
It’s OK To Occasionally Bend Grammar

It’s OK To Occasionally Bend Grammar

I’ve blogged before about how important it is to write how you talk. In order to accomplish this, you may need to take a few liberties with grammar that may drive the purists a little batty from time to time. Sometimes it’s easy to fall into a pattern of formal and collegial. If you’ve decided that’s you, and it’s producing results, more power to you, and keep doing what you’re doing. You’ll need to consider if you’re boring your readers with a faceless academic text, or if you’re providing the type of information that they’re looking for. If it’s not an accurate reflection of the ‘you’ in the real world, then what is? I can’t really answer that. You’ll have to figure out the best way to address your audience. Remember that informal can still be professional. So, just be who you are. An informal approach can turn certain readers away, but they may not be the type of readers you’d be looking for anyway. I want to be clear. There’s a difference between intentionally employing a more casual tone, and unintentionally using the wrong form of a common word. But…if you want to try and chat with your customers a little more informally, that could create some impact, dig? That sentence was probably a little too casual for me, but it’s a good segway. Here are a few grammar-bending tips to adopt a more informal style: (None of them are wrong, unless you’re writing term papers.) Ellipses. You know, those three little dots that trail off the end of a sentence. Although grammatically correct, you’ll be driving purists...
How To Beat Bad Grammar

How To Beat Bad Grammar

We all remember that dreaded feeling from our school days. The one where we were sitting in those uncomfortable desks, squirming in anticipation. Finally the teacher hands your paper back, and you turn it over, only to notice it covered in red pen. As much as we disliked it, the wake up calls served a purpose and made us better writers. It’s time to think back to those days, and realize that writing criticism is not something to take personally, but instead it’s a conversation on the way to improving a product. Writing is not like calculus. It’s something that you’ll use in real life, even if you’re not an engineer. In order to communicate ideas, you must know how to put words on a page. Sure it can be nuanced at times, but for a business owner, it’s a must. Simply put, bad grammar will cost you money. Your readers see the wrong usage of a word, typos, or verbs that don’t agree, and they click away. They assume that you don’t know what you are talking about. “Why should I believe him, if he can’t use the right it’s?”  Good Grammar Establishes Trust Your readers recognize the bad kind. They’re adept, and a page riddled with mistakes will have a financial impact until the problems are fixed. If you want comments on your blog posts, misspell something. You’ll get what you wished for, and not in a good way. But at least you’ll have the ability to fix. Those papers were riddled with red ink, because in the real world, bad grammar matters. It’s more than one...
Six Grammar Tips To Keep Readers Engaged

Six Grammar Tips To Keep Readers Engaged

I’ve stressed the importance of proper spelling and grammar over and over, for marketing copy. Nothing compromises trust and credibility like a blatant mistake with the English language. When you’re writing for yourself, this may just mean that readers put your work down or click away. When you’re writing about your business, this can mean financial loss. It’s time to get specific. Here are six grammar tips to keep your readers engaged from point A to point B:   There, Their, and They’re It’s time to learn the difference. There refers to a place, whether concrete or abstract. It is also used to acknowledge the existence of something.  For example: There is a music store downtown. Or: The pencil is over there on the desk. Their is a possessive adjective, indicating that a particular noun belongs to them. For example: Their books are still on the shelf. They’re is a contraction between they and are. For example: They’re planning a trip to Florida. That, Which, and Who They’re not interchangeable. Here’s the deal. If you can pull a clause out of a sentence, use which. If the clause is essential to the meaning, use that. For example: Can you bring me the pencil that I use to take notes? Or: The pencil, which I use to take notes, is over there. You can pull the “which” clause out of the second example, and it would still make sense. The same can’t be said for the first sentence. Also, don’t use that when you mean who. Any time you’re referring to a person, it’s who. Wrong: Your teacher is the person that...